Center for D&I and Partners Fund Seven Projects

June 22, 2016

The Center for Dissemination and Implementation pilot and small grants program at the Institute for Public Health announces funding for seven projects.

Two are co-funded by our Center for Global Health, two fully funded by the Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences at the Washington University School of Medicine, and three are fully funded by our Center for Dissemination and Implementation.

Pre-implementation of an evidence-based parent Intervention in Brazil (small grant)

PI: Ana A. Baumann

This project seeks to understand stakeholder perspectives in Brazil about the Parent Management Training-Oregon Model (PMTO), an evidence-based, structured-intervention program designed to help parents strengthen families at all levels. Informed by an evidence-based implementation framework, the project will conduct focus groups and semi-structured interviews with parents, providers, agency leaders and treatment developers to gather information about agency characteristics, system characteristics, intervention characteristics, and fit of the PMTO intervention for the Brazilian population. The project team will use the information gathered to inform adaptation and implementation of the PMTO intervention.

Scholars
Research Assistant Professor, Brown School
  • Funding provided jointly by the Center for Dissemination and Implementation and the Global Health Center at the Institute for Public Health at Washington University in St. Louis

Computer-facilitated smoking cessation treatments in psychiatric clinic (small grant)

PI: Li-Shiun Chen

This project is a feasibility study on use of a computer tablet-facilitated evidence-based treatment for smoking cessation to improve both implementation and clinical effectiveness outcomes in the unique, high-risk, underserved patient population with severe mental illness. This project will provide pilot data on feasibility of use in the clinic setting.

Scholars
Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine
  • Funding for this project is provided by the Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences through the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Program of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) at the National Institutes of Health, Grant Number UL1 TR000448

Interagency collaboration in context (pilot grant)

PI: Patrick J. Fowler

Federal, state, and local initiatives to address homelessness and family instability increasingly assume service coordination across public systems. However, the lack of a conceptual and methodological framework to assess readiness for interagency collaboration limits the potential to scale up emerging evidence-based approaches. This study investigates contextual factors that support interagency networks designed to assist homeless families.

Scholars
Associate Professor, Brown School
  • Funding provided by the Center for Dissemination and Implementation at the Institute for Public Health at Washington University in St. Louis

Improving child nutrition and livelihood security in indigenous communities of rural Ecuador (pilot grant)

PI: Lora L. Iannotti

This research aims to identify contextual facilitators and barriers to implementing a poultry production and nutrition intervention in two indigenous communities in Cotopaxi, Ecuador. It will use qualitative methods to characterize farming practices and attitudes and beliefs regarding poultry production and consumption. Quantitative methods will be used to assess household economic and nutritional status, land use, and environmental health risks for child nutrition.

Scholars
Associate Professor and Associate Dean for Public Health, Brown School
  • Funding provided jointly by the Center for Dissemination and Implementation and the Global Health Center at the Institute for Public Health at Washington University in St. Louis

Wake up and mobilize: Implementation, evaluation, and process (pilot grant)

PI: John C. Lin

Typically admission or readmission to the Intensive Care Unit of a hospital entails a period of enforced bed rest which has negative consequences for the patient’s health. Due to this there has been work on helping patients start moving around as early as possible after their admission. The Wake Up and Mobilize (Wake ME uP) is a study of early mobilization in a pediatric intensive care unit population. Guided by evidence-based implementation strategies, the study is assessing organizational culture, creating an implementation approach, and evaluating feasibility, acceptability, and clinical impact of a unit wide, progressive early mobilization program.

Scholars
Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine
  • Funding provided by the Center for Dissemination and Implementation at the Institute for Public Health at Washington University in St. Louis

Adaptation of the I-PASS framework for the pediatric intensive care unit (pilot grant)

PI: Peter Michelson

This study uses the Dynamic Adaptation Process framework to adapt the I-PASS Handoff strategies currently used on the inpatient wards in the pediatric intensive care unit to incorporate a shared mental model that is patient specific, while maintaining situational awareness of the acuity and activity of the entire pediatric intensive care unit. A shared mental model refers to a group understanding of a patient or situation, with the expectation that shared mental model translates to improvement in team functioning and care for patients. The I-PASS Handoff is an evidence-based approach to standardizing provider communication, with a specific focus on improving transitions of care. The team will assess initial efficacy, usability of and fidelity to the modified I-PASS handoff.

Scholars
Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonary Medicine, School of Medicine
  • Funding provided by the Center for Dissemination and Implementation at the Institute for Public Health at Washington University in St. Louis

Unpacking successful implementation of electronic screening and brief intervention (pilot grant)

PI: Alex T. Ramsey

Unhealthy alcohol use is a highly prevalent and costly yet addressable health risk behavior. Screening and brief intervention counseling is an effective public health approach for reducing unhealthy alcohol use in primary care; however, implementation of these strategies varies greatly and not much is known on the reasons why. This project examines the organizational context and strategies used in cases of successful and failed screening and brief intervention counseling implementation to understand variations in outcomes.

Scholars
Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine
  • Funding for this project is provided by the Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences through the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Program of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) at the National Institutes of Health, Grant Number UL1 TR000448