2021 Institute for Public Health Annual Conference Summary

The 14th annual Institute for Public Health Conference may have ended, but the focus on resilience and preparing our public health infrastructure for the future, continues. For this year’s hybrid (live and virtual) conference, the institute convened nearly 400 faculty, students, public health leaders and the public for education and discussion on: Fortifying our public […]

Premature Birth: Paving the Path for my Granddaughter

Written by Ebony B. Carter, MD, MPH, assistant professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine Embed from Getty Images “In the shadows of our finest medical facilities, where kings and shahs travel thousands of miles for the world’s best medical care, black babies continue to die.” My mother opened nearly every […]

People as people, not problems

Written by Antonia Asher, MPH Candidate, Tulane University and participant in the 2019 Institute for Public Health Summer Research Program – Public & Global Health Track As a participant of the Institute of Public Health Summer Research Program- Public & Global Health track, I am working with Dr. Darrell Hudson, Associate Professor, Brown School, and his research […]

Preterm birth rates in immigrant populations on the rise under trump administration

Written by Monica Villarruel, MPH, 2019 practicum student at the Center for Community Health Partnership & Research at the Institute for Public Health; and Clark-Fox Institute Policy Scholar A 2018 study led by researchers at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health demonstrated a connection between sociopolitical stressors and rising rates of premature births among […]

Keeping the public healthy: Who will pay?

Written by Will Ross, MD, MPH, associate dean for diversity, professor of medicine in the School of Medicine and Institute for Public Health 2018 Annual Conference moderator In 2002, The Institute of Medicine issued a report entitled, “Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?” The report concluded that “… public health professionals must have a framework for […]

Mental health equity

At the time of publishing, Jorge Riopedre was president of Casa de Salud. No sooner is there yet another school shooting, or for that matter a mass shooting of any kind, than the mantra of access to mental health services starts pouring forth from the mouth of politicians and activists. Paul Ryan, Speaker of the […]

The intersection of precision medicine and public health

Written by Sarah Wishloff, undergraduate student at Amherst College and participant in the Institute for Public Health Summer Research Program This past week, Dr. William Powderly, the Larry J. Shapiro Director of the Institute for Public Health, led a seminar on the intersection of precision medicine and public health. Precision medicine is a medical model […]

Understanding the significance of my research in the real world

Written by Tiffany Xie, undergraduate student at Indiana University Bloomington and participant in the Institute for Public Health Summer Research Program At the Institute for Public Health Summer Research Program, I am lucky to work under the mentorship of Dr. Kathleen Bucholz, Professor of Psychiatry at the Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. Bucholz is […]

Learning more about precision medicine

Written by Anne Trolard, manager for the Public Health Data and Training Center at the Institute for Public Health An article in my inbox on precision medicine caught my eye recently, reminding me I had wanted to learn more about this buzz-word in healthcare. The article, in WUSTL’s The Source, describes precision medicine (PM) as […]

Summer Research Program alumni blog – Suraj Arshanapally

By Suraj Arshanapally, Institute for Public Health Summer Research Program alumnus Last summer, I was enrolled in the 2016 Institute of Public Health Summer Research Program cohort. I had the opportunity to learn from two incredible mentors, Dr. Kathleen Bucholz and Dr. Kimberly Werner, within the Department of Psychiatry. As a research intern, I investigated […]

Summer Research Program alumni blog – Karthik Rohatgi

Written by Karthik Rohatgi, Summer Research Program alumnus In summer 2015, through the Institute for Public Health Summer Research Program, I was fortunate to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Indi Trehan on the final stages of the ARTMAM study. The goal of the study was to determine the effects of simultaneous treatment with […]

Summer Research Program alumni blog – Megan Hunt

Written by Megan Hunt, Institute for Public Health Summer Research Program alumna Throughout my life, I had been interested in pursuing a career in healthcare. However, it wasn’t until my experience in the Institute for Public Health Summer Research Program that I was able to identify exactly where I saw myself in the field. As […]

Clinica de Migrantes documentary screening and panel discussion

Written by Kyle Smith, undergraduate in economics and computational biology at University of Rochester and participant in the Institute for Public Health Summer Research Program On July 10, Casa de Salud, a local organization offering affordable or no-cost healthcare, welcomed community members for a viewing of Clinica de Migrantes: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of […]

Health disparities in alcohol use

Written by Rajadhar Reddy, undergraduate in neuroscience at University of Texas at Dallas and participant in the Institute for Public Health Summer Research Program  I turn 21 next week, so writing a blog post on alcohol feels a bit ironic. But as alcohol consumption is the fourth leading preventable cause of death in the United […]

St. Louis bus tour

Written by Delphine Zhu, undergraduate in neuroscience and anthropology at Smith College and participant in the Institute for Public Health Summer Research Program After getting to know one another on the first day of the program, we had the opportunity to learn more about St. Louis on a bus tour. The bus tour was led […]

Institute awards seed funding to Jason Q. Purnell

In the latest of several recent honors for Jason Q. Purnell, PhD, MPH, the Institute for Public Health has awarded him $20,000 from the MTM, Inc., Community Health Access Fund for a community-based participatory research (CBPR) project addressing health disparities in north St. Louis. “The CBPR approach ensures that community members are involved throughout all […]

After two years, ‘For the Sake of All’ continues to push for action and outcomes

Written by Jason Q. Purnell, PhD, associate professor in the Brown School When the For the Sake of All report was released two years ago chronicling the significant racial disparities in health and other life outcomes in the St. Louis region, there was much concern about the report collecting dust. We have worked hard to […]

Implementation science and health disparities: The quality gap is still here

Racial and ethnic minorities in the United States continue to face serious mental health care disparities, receiving lower quality care and completing treatment less often than their non-Hispanic white counterparts. (1,2) Mental health care disparities are complex, in large part because factors that contribute to disparities occur at a variety of levels and include  individuals, families, […]

Health equity series

The Missouri Foundation for Health has compiled five reports on health disparities within the state as part of their Health Equity Series, assembling a variety of data sources in an effort to document inequities impacting minority groups. African American Health Disparities in Missouri provides evidence that African Americans are trailing the state’s white population on […]

Economics, policy, and racial disparities

Health disparities has been an important topic for public health researchers for years, with much or most of the focus on disparities across racial groups in the US, where we see wide disparities on almost every outcome measure. In the St. Louis area and region, health disparities remains a critical topic where if anything the […]

“Where did you graduate from high school?” Insurance as education reform

Written by William F. Tate, the Edward Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis “My ear hurts.” “It’s hard to breathe.” “I feel afraid and it won’t go away.” Imagine learning to read or doing a science project with otitis media or asthma. Picture taking a major exam […]

White fear creates white spaces and exacerbates health disparities

Written by Melody Goodman, PhD, assistant professor at the Washington University School of Medicine “White fear has manifested itself in outright violence post-slavery through the imposition of Jim Crow segregation. White fear has manifested itself legislatively via redlining laws and cruel lending practices barring blacks from owning property in ‘white neighborhoods.’ White fear has manifested itself […]

For the Sake of All project update

For the Sake of All recently released an “Evidence in Action” update, detailing the progress that has been made since the release of its signature report eighteen months ago. The initiative began in 2013 as an effort to investigate the health and well-being of African Americans in the St. Louis region, with an eye toward […]

Creating economic opportunity in St. Louis

Written by Jason Q. Purnell, PhD, associate professor in the Brown School Last year, the For the Sake of All project team released a series of policy briefs and a report that analyzed the data around health disparities in the St. Louis region and outlined a set of recommendations to help close the gap. This […]